10 Weird and Wonderful Things About Bees and Honey

3
I could write a book about bees following the amount I learned WWOOFing at Earthbound Honey, but I don’t have the patience so these ten points will have to do. They cover the surprising, the interesting and the odd facts about bees and honey.

– After bees sting you they endure a horrific death. They fly away while their stingers remain which rips out all their insides in the process. A gruesome way to go.

– The good news for us is that bee venom is good for you (unless you’re allergic to it)! It can help give a boost to the immune system, get rid of wrinkles and even treat arthritis.
WWOOF, travel, Green, Compass, Sustainability, Environment, Volunteer, Journey, Organic, Farming, Recipe, Garden, Honey, Bee, Manuka,  – Bees have a career ladder. When they’re born they have orientation where they meet the boss (queen) then they become a wet nurse, cleaner, gravedigger, pollen collector and ultimately a honey bee.

– After work they have chores to do. They take cold air from outside and heat it up to get rid of the moisture in the collected nectar to prevent it from fermenting. They then cap it off, leaving the honey ready to be eaten or harvested.
WWOOF, travel, Green, Compass, Sustainability, Environment, Volunteer, Journey, Organic, Farming, Recipe, Garden, Honey, Bee, Manuka, – Leaving honey on your skin for 20 minutes before washing it off has shown to help dry or sensitive skin. Bees wax is also good at treating eczema.

– Honey can help with hay fever. If you eat honey with pollen you can build up a tolerance during those frustrating months. For best results eat Pohutukawa.
WWOOF, travel, Green, Compass, Sustainability, Environment, Volunteer, Journey, Organic, Farming, Recipe, Garden, Honey, Bee, Manuka, – Bees make royal jelly. It’s super rich in energy and, unsurprisingly, it’s for the queen because each day she produces twice her body weight in eggs

– Bees locate their hives through sunlight, smell and memory which makes moving their hives a very sensitive business. They struggle to find their home if it’s been moved by more than 3 feet, but somehow, you can move it 3 miles away and they’ll find it again. Odd
WWOOF, travel, Green, Compass, Sustainability, Environment, Volunteer, Journey, Organic, Farming, Recipe, Garden, Honey, Bee, Manuka, – Honey is antifungal, antiseptic and antimicrobial meaning you can use it to prevent infection on open wounds.

– Bees can sense when you get stung. If you’re stung then they’ll presume you were stung for a reason so the chances of another attack increase after the first blow.
WWOOF, travel, Green, Compass, Sustainability, Environment, Volunteer, Journey, Organic, Farming, Recipe, Garden, Honey, Bee, Manuka,
 

Share.

About Author

Steve

With a background as a journalist and a chef, Steve loves to travel and find the story at the source of our food. Whether it’s wine, honey, beef, vegetables or fruit, Steve wants to show that volunteer travelling can provide a master class in all things sustainable and delicious.

3 Comments

  1. Lindsay Williams on

    What is amazing is that this stuff has been almost ‘forgotten’. There must have been a time when almost everyone knew honey was an antiseptic but now most people would go to Boots. I have friends who swear by a ‘honey plaster’ (honey inside an elastoplast on a wound) but I had not heard of this until I was 50 years old! I have often thought about keeping bees just to avoid arthritis. I did know about the bee sting thing. I also heard that almost no bee keepers have every died of cancer.

    • I have a very fruity video link for you this week Diana et al. If you’ve never seen it bofere I think you’ll find it very funny. And, if you have seen it bofere – bet you’ll just love watching it again!! Pure comedy genius.May this weekend bee filled with beeutiful things for all you honeys!Sweet Saturday to you!

  2. We estimate that the hive of bees would be 1,200 bees. We found this anewsr by counting 1/4 of the picture. We found that there were 70 bees in 1/4 of the picture. We added 70+70+70+70=280 bees. Then we rounded 280 to 300 bees. Next we knew that 300 was just 1/4 of the entire bee hive. So we multiplied 300 4=1,200 bees in the bee hive. We are so glad that we did not have to count 1,200 bees! Thank goodness we know how to estimate!Mrs. Martel’s 2nd & 3rd graders

Leave A Reply